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DRHC Redevelopment Frequently Asked Questions

DRHC Redevelopment


Pardon Our Progress

The Dauphin Regional Health Centre is undergoing a major redevelopment and you may have some questions.

Here are answers to our most Frequently Asked Questions:

 

Why are the main front and back entrances at Dauphin Regional Health Centre (DRHC) closed?

This is part of the $23-million dollar Redevelopment of Dauphin Regional Health Centre. A new Temporary entrance to the hospital opened off Jackson Street on November 6, 2017.
The initial project phase involved construction of a Temporary Emergency Department.  The Temporary Emergency Department opened November 14, 2017.  Construction work is now beginning on redeveloping the former Emergency Department area.


Where do I go to get into the hospital if the former entrances are closed?

A new temporary entrance to the DRHC has been created at the back of the hospital and community health services building off of Jackson Street. Watch for signage.


Am I still able to access the DRHC front ramp or drop off areas in front of DRHC?

No, these areas are restricted (to ambulance and physicians only) as the next construction phase is underway.


Where can I park my vehicle if I have an appointment or am visiting someone at DRHC?

Public/visitor parking areas have been enhanced at the back of Dauphin Regional Health Centre.  Access to the hospital’s back public parking lot is via Jackson Street or 4th Ave. SW. Watch for signage.


Are there any provisions being made to access the DRHC if I, or a family member, has a disability or faces mobility or other health-related challenges?

Yes, near the temporary entrance there will be clearly designated and marked areas for those with disability, mobility or accessibility challenges to try make accessing the DRHC a little easier.  This includes wheelchair access and handicapped parking areas. These areas will be closely monitored to ensure they are being used appropriately. Watch for signage.


If I require a wheelchair, are they available?

Wheelchairs are available inside the hospital entrance at the information/reception desk.  Please inquire at the desk upon arriving at DRHC.


What happens if I take a HandiVan, Medical Transportation Vehicle (non-EMS) or Taxi to the Hospital?

Transportation assists, such as the supports listed above, still need to use the temporary back entrance at the hospital. There is a designated emergency patient drop-off/pick up area off Jackson Street. Watch for signage.


Where can I gain access to the DRHC if I am a staff member?

An entrance for staff only is accessible at the back of the DRHC.  Watch for signage.


We’ve heard of recent changes at the DRHC Emergency Department.  If I want to access the Emergency/Outpatient Department, where do I go?

The DRHC Emergency Department remains open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The only change has been a recent relocation to a new space (still on the main floor of the hospital) while renovations continue.
As always, if you have an urgent or emergent situation, please call 911 for EMS (ambulance) services.   If your situation is non-urgent and a visit to the DRHC Emergency/Outpatient Dept. is required, please check in with the reception area at DRHC.  The reception area is best accessed from the temporary entrance off Jackson Street.


What about other health services, like Lab & Imaging? Are they impacted right now because of all the changes related to construction?

The Lab/Imaging Department at DRHC is still at its familiar location on the hospital main floor.  Please check in with the reception desk upon entering the facility.
No other front line health care services/departments within the hospital have been significantly impacted by the construction.


What is the timeframe for some of these changes?

These changes will last into 2019. The Temporary Emergency Department and temporary entrance will remain functioning until renovations and new construction is completed on the old Emergency Department.  More information on these timelines will be identified in early to mid-2019.


What can we look forward to when the renovations at DRHC are completed?

The DRHC ED will be completely updated and standardized. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • Enhanced treatment, exam and observation rooms;
  • A resuscitation/trauma care room;
  • A modernized Special Care Unit for extended care of patients;
  • Access to the EDIS public notification system to track and monitor activity and care within the Emergency Department waiting area;
  • A decontamination room;
  • An enclosed ambulance garage;
  • A new main entry to the health centre including a driveway.

Do you have a question about the DRHC Redevelopment Project? Please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Updated November 2017

Volunteers Needed for CVITP

The Community Income Tax Volunteer Program (CVITP) needs your help.

 

Fact: income and health are directly related. Better income can lead to better health, education and well-being. Completing an income tax return can improve income by providing access to federal, provincial and local benefits and programs.

The Community Volunteer Income Tax Program is a partnership between Prairie Mountain Health and the Canada Revenue Agency. Through this program low-income individuals with simple tax situations are connected to volunteers who complete and file their income tax and benefit return.

Be part of the solution! Lend a hand!

If you have a basic understanding of income tax and a willingness to give  back to your community, we are looking for volunteers.

As a CVITP volunteer you will:

• increase your tax knowledge
• gain new skills or improve existing ones
• get free access to tax preparation software for your personal return
• Become more connected to your community
• give back to your community

Volunteers are needed in the following comunities:

Birtle      Boissevain      Brandon    Carberry    Dauphin     Deloraine     Elkhorn    Killarney     Melita     Minnedosa     Neepawa    Rivers     Russell    Shoal Lake  
Souris     Ste. Rose     Swan River      Virden

 If you are interested in volunteering, please contact 7th Street Health Access Centre Brett Turner, CVITP Lead:  204-578-4812  |  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or
Kristal McKinney, Administrative Assistant: 204- 578-4806  | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Operation Walk Nicaragua

With the memories and impact of last year’s Operation Walk mission to Nicaragua still firmly embedded in our minds, Brandon operating room nurses Rachelle Lesy and Stephanie Phillips, surgeon Dr. Norm Klippenstein, and newly recruited nurse Lisa Cobbe once again joined the Winnipeg team and returned to that Central American country to provide life-changing knee replacements to those who otherwise could not hope for such transformative surgery. We spent another intense and unforgettable week in an inner city hospital in Managua to help the team of about 60 achieve its humanitarian goals, once again reaping the intangible rewards that such service often brings. The spirited solidarity of medical personnel, support workers, and volunteers was a tribute to the common commitment to this mission and the people of one of the poorest countries in the Americas. This year we targeted an even larger number of debilitated patients, continuing to build up the hospital’s depleted and outdated equipment needs, and once again going outside our medical mandate to visit several schools and social agencies. This ambitious agenda required a full year of fundraising, a collection of donated supplies, and development of a medical and volunteer team to address the many facets that such a complex joint replacement service requires. Once again the team rallied the necessary support, overcame unpredictable yet seemingly perpetual  challenges, and at the end of the week declared this year’s mission to be the best of the 6 annual trips yet.

A shipping container of donated equipment and supplies arrived in Nicaragua about a month ahead of the team, once again requiring negotiation and management of red tape to allow it to be unloaded. The drugs we brought for the anaesthetics were initially considered illegal but were eventually cleared. An advance group arrived several days prior to the rest of the team to preview and select those patients most in need of surgery and ensure the safe transfer of the shipped supplies. One of the 10 donated hospital beds had been diverted by a high-ranking government official and had to be delicately retrieved, and a critical set of knee implants which didn’t arrive had to be brought with the Brandon team’s air luggage at the last minute. The local wards were cleared to prepare for the dozens of new post-op patients. A lost passport and a last minute scheduling conflict left the team without two anaesthetists, requiring the recruitment of local staff to fill in on short notice.

 Once we started operating the first day, it became evident that workflow would be an additional challenge. The minimally equipped and outdated sterilizing facilities at the hospital were unable to accommodate the high pace, significantly restricting the availability of clean operating equipment. This resulted in delays and the need for some staff to work 18 hour days to support the planned procedures. Cats in the hospital and flies in the OR were accepted as unavoidable local conditions. Supplies that we would normally discard after each case at home were carefully collected by their staff for recycling. The limited air conditioning in the crowded hospital seemed to only minimally temper the 30 plus degree heat. The roads to the rural schools we visited had been washed out by torrential rains the week before and were just being rendered passable by road crews on our arrival. Each day additional challenges required ingenuity to ensure the ongoing success of the mission.

Despite these and other obstacles presented by the realities of working in a developing country, the Operation Walk team performed 69 joint replacements in three days, in a hospital that typically performs 40 or 50 joint replacements a year, and only for those that can pay. This represented the most ever by our team, and for what were probably the most challenging deformities encountered by our Nicaraguan missions to date. Some patients had not been able to walk for several years. Many could not work or look after their families. Working dawn to dusk, disregarding the usual division of responsibilities we maintain in our Brandon OR, innovating and substituting for gaps in equipment availability, constantly working through Spanish interpreters, and feeding off a high level of group energy and encouragement, we pushed the pace with minimal breaks and our usual conveniences.

 This year we brought previously used knee braces and other orthopaedic appliances which had been donated through the Brandon Clinic for distribution in Nicaragua. It is hoped that this project can be further developed to help those who cannot make it onto operating lists or who might not be candidates for surgery. There were many conversations around ideas for introducing resources and initiatives into a society that has a seemingly endless need for medical and other support.

Incorporating local medical personnel into our work has become an appreciated hallmark of Operation Walk, distinguishing our Canadian approach from other groups who have preceded us. Once again the outpouring of gratitude from the patients and their families was overwhelming and humbling. Embraces, tears, and prayers were offered in thanks to our members. And again the individual stories and personalities gave the surgical and rehabilitative component of our mission a profoundly unforgettable human element that can’t be measured by straightened limbs or extended walking distances.

A parallel initiative to visit an orphanage, a centre for troubled young mothers and several schools gave additional opportunity to bring donated supplies and encouragement to areas of need that were a sober reminder of the vast disparity between our respective societies. A festival put on for a rural school, with piñatas, pizza and face painting was just as joyous, however, as any school party in our country, and donated baseball and soccer equipment allowed the children to show off sporting skills that had been honed on much shabbier gear. There is no greater stimulus to inspire hearts and humanitarian efforts than seeing needy situations where such a small contribution can make such a big difference.

And so the four of us returned to Brandon the richer for the experience and the happier for the opportunity to serve an area of need in such a unique way. Back home our Canadian jobs take on new meaning in light of the unforgettable experiences of this short but intense surgical mission and the wonderful people of Nicaragua we were able to engage. We are most grateful for the generous donations made in support of this trip, for the backing and encouragement we have received from our medical community, and for supportive friends and family who will be hearing many more stories from our adventure.

Submitted by : Dr. Norm Klippenstein, Orthopedic Surgeon

 

 

   
Client beforePatient before surgery.       client after

Patient after surgery

      drk

 

      ladies

Manitoba Nephrology Nursing Course

Brandon Regional Health Centre in collaboration with the Manitoba Nephrology Nursing Course (Provincial Dialysis Program) will be offering a course for 2 nursing staff – (1) Registered Nurse and (1) Licensed Practical Nurse.

The course will start the week of February 4, 2018 running until April 7, 2018.  The full 9 weeks of training will take place at the Brandon Regional Health Centre (clinical, theory and preceptorship).  Training will be funded by the Brandon Regional Health Centre.  Upon completion of this course, the successful applicant is qualified to practice in the Hemodialysis Unit.

Registered Nurse candidates should possess the following:
- Current active practicing registration in the C.R.N.M.
- Two years Acute Care Medical/Surgical or Critical Care experience as an RN within the last 5 years.
- Commitment to complete the Manitoba Nephrology Nursing Course and 1 year employment in the Hemodialysis Unit at Brandon Regional Health Centre following completion of the course.
- Current BLS
- Demonstrated leadership skills and professional/organizational activities
- Evidence of professional development (continuing education), activity in professional association and community involvement.
- Demonstrated skill of effective patient teaching
- Awareness of the interdisciplinary team approach and willingness to participate as a member of the Dialysis Team.
- Demonstrated problem solving skills
- Demonstrated management of conflict and change
- Demonstrated good interpersonal and communication skill

Licensed Practical Nurse candidates should possess the following:
- Current active practicing registration in the C.L.P.N.M.
- Two years Acute Care Medical/Surgical or Critical Care experience as an LPN within the last 5 years.
- Commitment to complete the Manitoba Nephrology Nursing Course and 1 year employment in the Hemodialysis Unit at Brandon Regional Health Centre following completion of the course.
- Current BLS
- Demonstrated evidence of completed IV/CVAD competency
- Evidence of professional development (continuing education), activity in professional association and community involvement.
- Demonstrated skill of effective patient teaching
- Awareness of the interdisciplinary team approach and willingness to participate as a member of the Dialysis Team.
- Demonstrated management of conflict and change
- Demonstrated good interpersonal and communication skill 

Prior to the start of the course, successful applicants will be required to complete a self-study package and pass a pre-requisite test.

 
In order to be considered for the training, all applicants must submit a current resume including cover letter to:

 Kim Wallis
 CS1-134
 Brandon Regional Health Centre
 150 McTavish Ave East
 Brandon, Manitoba, R7A 2B3
 Or email to:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Applications must be received by Friday, December 15, 2017 AT 4:00 P.M.


For further information please contact:   Kim Wallis at 204-578-4157 or Rick Paddock-Thiessen at 204-578-2151

 

Managing Holiday Stress and the Holiday Blues

Not-So-Happy Holidays: Managing Holiday Stress and the Holiday Blues

In the film, Meet Me in St. Louis, Judy Garland sang the line “Have yourself a merry little Christmas, Let your heart be light. From now on, our troubles will be out of sight.” Unfortunately, many people struggle with heavy hearts and numerous stressors over the holidays. The term “holiday stress” reflects increased symptoms of anxiety, impatience, fatigue, and depressed mood that many people experience over the holiday season. A number of factors tend to contribute to holiday stress, including financial concerns, tight schedules and heavy demands, loss of loved ones, isolation, and unrealistic expectations. And when stress is at its peak, it can be very hard to stop and regroup.

Stress cannot always be prevented; however, the following tips can be helpful to manage stressors during the holiday season.

  • Be aware of your feelings. If someone close to you has recently died or if you are away from loved ones, realize that it is normal to feel sadness and grief. It is also important to express your feelings. Do not try to “force yourself” to be happy just because it is the holiday season.
  • Have realistic expectations. Too many people expect that the holidays need to be “perfect.” There is no such thing as perfection and having those expectations will only add to the stress of the season. An asymmetrical tree or an over-cooked turkey will not ruin your holiday; rather, it will create a family memory. Perennial movie favorites, such as A Christmas Story or A Charlie Brown Christmas are reminders of the endearing qualities of these imperfections.
  • Stay within your budget. Before you shop for gifts and food, decide how much money you can afford to spend. Then stick to your budget. Don't try to buy happiness with a mountain of gifts. Some alternatives include: giving homemade gifts and starting a family gift exchange. If your children’s wish list exceeds your budget, have a talk with them about reasonable expectations and remind them that the holidays are not about expensive gifts.
  • Manage your time and set boundaries. Saying yes when you should say no can leave you feeling resentful and overwhelmed. Friends and colleagues will understand if you cannot participate in every project or activity. Set priorities and let go of impossible goals. Don't spend all of your time planning activities for your family. You might end up feeling drained and unappreciated. Take the time you need to finish tasks that are important to you. Don't try to complete everything at once and ask others to help you complete chores.
  • Keep healthy and take time for yourself. All too often, when people feel stressed-out and overwhelmed, they forget about their self-care. Also, the holiday season is ripe with opportunities to overindulge. Make sure that you are eating regularly and healthily, that you are getting a decent night’s sleep and that you are getting enough physical activity into your day. This can be difficult when the weather turns cold. Finally, pace yourself. Give yourself opportunities to rest and replenish. By slowing down, you will have more energy to accomplish your goals.
  • Do something for others. By volunteering or assisting others, we can get out of our experience for awhile. Helping out at a food bank, or a shelter can also provide us with some perspective in terms of our worries and concerns.
  • Stay connected and seek support. When we feel sad or overburdened, we often isolate or avoid others that can add to our burden. Ensure that you are connected with others, and seek support if needed. Getting things out in the open can help you manage your feelings and find solutions for your stress.

If you continue to feel overwhelmed, consider seeing a professional such as a mental health counsellor to help you manage your holiday stress. Call the following numbers for assistance: OVER THE AGE OF 18: 1-888-379-7699 or UNDER THE AGE OF 18: 1-866-403-5459.

To access mental health services in your area, call 1-866-403-5459 (under that age of 18) or 1-855-222-6011 to be connected with the service provider nearest you.

 

 

 

 

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